From The Desk Of Thrice: Emilíana Torrini’s “Fisherman’s Woman”

THRICELOGOA dozen years into its career, Thrice is still evolving. Following 2005’s experimental/atmospheric Vheissu and four-part concept album The Alchemy Index Vols. I & II (2007) and Vols. III & IV (2008), the California quartet—vocalist/guitarist Dustin Kensrue, guitarist/engineer Teppei Teranishi and Breckenridge brothers Eddie (bass) and Riley (drums)—has issued the edgier, hard-rock-leaning Beggars (Vagrant). On paper, such a description might make you believe the LP is a return to the post-hardcore days of Thrice’s first three albums, though Beggars is far more mature and varied than that. Unfortunately, the record was leaked in July, forcing the band to change the release date and marketing plan for Beggars, but Thrice seems to have come out of all this extracurricular drama unscathed. As the foursome prepares for its upcoming U.K. tour, they are also guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our Q&A with them.

emiliana_torrini550Teppei Teranishi: Fisherman’s Woman by Emilíana Torrini is one of my all-time favorite records. I don’t know what it is, but it struck a chord with me ever since my first listen. I actually remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when I first heard it. We were in NYC on a day off doing a bunch of press, had just done something for MTV, and I was sitting by myself in my hotel room. A friend of mine told me about this record and urged me to pick up, so I headed down to the Virgin Megastore in Times Square. They didn’t have this particular record, but I picked up her previous record, Love In The Time Of Science. I got back to the hotel room and started ripping the CD onto my computer and was able to find Fisherman’s Woman on iTunes. I bought it, and that was that. I remember a lot really insignificant things about that night (like staying up late and watching Tommy Boy, then onto Black Sheep), and I think it was because of my experience with this record that I do. It’s just one of those moments that has stuck with me. Super stripped down, instantly nostalgic, great acoustic-guitar playing, and of course, there’s Torrini’s meltingly charming voice. It all comes together perfectly. Sappy, I know. Video after the jump.

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