From The Desk Of Simon Love: Now Is The Time To Say Goodbye

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: 

All good things must come to an end and so must my tenure as guest editor of MAGNET. Thanks so much for having me.

Au revoir my dudes.

Sincerely,
S. Love x

From The Desk Of Simon Love: All Of My Friends

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: This is where I very generously throw the spotlight on some of my friends bands.

The School
Liz, the mastermind behind the School, was in my old group the Loves, where I taught her everything I know about how not to do everything. She’s got one of the purest voices I’ve ever heard. Lovely ’60s-influenced, girl-group pop music.

Mikey Georgeson
The first band I saw live when I moved to London was David Devant And His Spirit Wife. I met Mikey not long afterwards but didn’t recognise him as The Vessel because he didn’t have the wig on. Fast-forward five years, and I was honoured to be asked to be in his backing band, the Civilised Scene, and to play chug-a-lug guitar on his brilliant Blood And Brambles album.

Tender Prey
Sometimes, you meet someone and you think, “Yep, you’re one of the good ones.” This is how I felt when I met Laura (a.k.a. Tender Prey) a few years ago. Her first LP, Organ Calzone, is outstanding. I especially recommend “Strong Feelings.” Her second record, Falling Off Chairs, is weirder. In a good way.

Language Of Prarie Dogs
I wrote “Motherfuckers” as the b-side for LOPD‘s first single, “Lone Giant,” with the brief from my old friend, the actor Matthew A. Kaufman, of “Write something Christmassy.” Hmm. They’ve just released their first LP, The Water Boatman, and I can highly recommend it.

Buzzard Buzzard Buzzard
Not “friends” as such (I only met them the other night) but genuinely one of the best bands I’ve seen in a loooooooong time. Amazingly tight ’70s glam-rock songs coupled with some smooth moves from frontman Tom.

Radiophonic Tuckshop
The latest incarnation of my Celtic psych brother and professional Paul McCartney: Joe Kane. A kaleidoscope of sound from the mind of someone obsessed with the best bits of pop music. The Christmas LP released in 2017 is a wonder to behold.

Alexander Christopher Hale
I covered Alex‘s “Seasonal Affective Disorder #2” on my Tennis Fan EP in 2016, and I’m sad he’s not done more recently. Get your finger out, Alex.

From The Desk Of Simon Love: My Favourite Musical Weirdos, 
Part Three (Swamp Dogg

)

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: Swamp Dogg came to me through his cover of John Prine’s “Sam Stone.” It started playing automagically on the YouTube, and from the photo (the cover of his Cuffed, Collared & Tagged), I thought he was a modern neo-soul singer. But further investigation lead me to a world of wonder. His albums are full of psychedelic soul with one foot in social commentary and another in goofy vignettes. He also has a great line in great liner notes but awful record sleeves cf: 1971’s Rat On. He’s still going, too. Next month he’s releasing an LP, Love, Loss And Auto-Tune.

From The Desk Of Simon Love: A Few Words In Defense Of “Death Of A Ladies’ Man” By Leonard Cohen



Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: I remember buying this LP in D’Vinyls in Cardiff in about 1998. I think I only got it because it was 50p and I’d heard of but not heard Leonard Cohen. (We didn’t get the Internet in Wales until 2011.) For years, it was stuck on my shelf unheard until one day, in a fit of boredom (or looking for records to chuck out/give away), I played it. And I laughed a lot.

Reading about it now, it sounds like a nightmare to record with Phil Spector throwing his hair about. I stole this quote from Wikipedia, who stole it from a book: “Spector pointed a loaded pistol at Cohen’s throat, cocked it, and said, ‘I love you, Leonard.’ Quietly, Cohen responded, ‘I hope you love me, Phil.'”

It’s the only LP of Cohen’s that I can listen to all the way through. It keeps you engaged with the arrangements and the humour scattered among the broken-hearted/hungover sentiments. “Memories” and its tale of adolescent frustration with Spector’s wall of everything always brings a chuckle to my face.

I DJ in a bar in North London every month, and more often than not I’ll play “Don’t Go Home With Your Hard-On” late on in the night for those poor souls who might have to despite their best efforts.

If I had a time machine, I’d travel back and do in the man who showed Leonard Cohen his first synthesizer.

From The Desk Of Simon Love: Deadlines

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

“I love deadlines.” —Douglas Adams

Love: Unlike that sci-fi nerd, I don’t like deadlines. Sincerely, S. Love x is the first LP I’ve ever made where I’ve had a time when it has to be ready by. I didn’t like it. 

Considering that we started recording these songs in 2016, you’d think I’d be on top of it all, but unfortunately, I don’t do this for a living and baby needs a new pair of everything, so I have to do a normal day job. I’m writing this there when I should be working. 

In the end though, the LP came out brilliantly. I’ve been told. 

My next record will be ready when it’s ready.

From The Desk Of Simon Love: My Favourite Musical Weirdos, 
Part Two (Robyn Hitchcock

)

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: My friend Paul Wright makes great mix CDs, and in 2001, he made me one of the Soft Boys (including their fantastic Underwater Moonlight LP). Ever since then, I’ve been a huge fan of whatever Robyn Hitchcock does. 

I asked Robyn via Twitter if he could adopt me and then we could roam the streets at night fighting crime. I think it confused him when I played a gig with him a few years ago. 

He taught me it was OK to ramble on onstage about whatever was in my head at any point—halfway through a song is fine—and that polka-dot or violent-patterned shirts are where it’s at. 

If you need a starting point for his solo work, I can recommend I Often Dream Of Trains, Eye, Respect or The Man Upstairs.

—photo for MAGNET by Christian Lantry

From The Desk Of Simon Love: How The Sausage Was Made

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: This is all about a Mixcloud thing I made, but you have to substitute the words “the sausage” for Sincerely, S. Love x, “made” for “influenced by” and “How” for “What.” That doesn’t make any sense. This mix is songs and acts that have influenced me over the last few years in the making of Sincerely, S. Love x, which is out now on Tapete Records. Jesus.

From The Desk Of Simon Love: A Few Words In Defense Of “Be Here Now” By Oasis

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: The first ever “gig” I went to was Oasis at the Astoria (which is now a branch of Santander) in Cardiff in December 1994. I thought I was going to be crushed to death, but a great time was had by all. I loved and wanted to be them with all of my being for about three years. Despite this, I think I’m the only guitar player of my age, hair type and class who can’t play “Wonderwall.”

By the time Be Here Now was released in 1997, I’d fallen off the Oasis bandwagon due to snobbishness. I remember being driven by a friend to London from Cardiff one day that summer and falling asleep as the opening strains of “D’You Know What I Mean?” started. I woke up a few hours later feeling refreshed, and it was still going. It is a long record.

In 2016, inspired by Noel Gallagher remixing “D’You Know What I Mean?” I went through the album and did my own “re-think.” As I didn’t have access to the master tapes, I just chopped out the unneccessary songs (hello “Magic Pie”), shortened the too-long songs (hello “It’s Gettin’ Better (Man!!”) and put bits of others in the good songs (the hilarious scream from “Fade In/Fade Out” in the middle of “D’You Know What I Mean?”). Now, even though it’s only eight-songs long, it’s a tight 50-odd minutes of quiet bass-end goodness.



I’m available for other remixing work …

From The Desk Of Simon Love: Meet The Old Romantics

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: I don’t make my hit albums all by myself, you know. I mean I could, but it’d just take longer and I’d be lonely. I’d like to introduce you to the great bunch of lads that make up my backing band, the Old Romantics (in alphabetical order)

:

Alex plays the trumpet and does occasional backing vocals with a sideline in excellent dancing. He joined us last year after he replied to an ad I put on Gumtree looking for a trumpeter. In real life, he’s a teacher, but we don’t hold that against him.

Daniel plays the guitar and does backing vocals. I first met Daniel in the toilets of the Buffalo Bar (R.I.P.) in 2007 when we shared a mutual drummer, Jonny (R.I.P.). Since then, we’ve been on many adventures mostly involving alcohol. I almost killed him with a wine bottle in Manchester in 2009.

Ian plays the drums. He came to the group via Mark after they’d performed in a covers band at a wedding and we needed a drummer. Thankfully, he’s not only a great sticksman but also, an all-round lovely fellow. Pop fact! I’ve never seen Ian unhappy.

Mark plays the keyboard, does backing vocals and also has produced and mixed both of my LPs. The first band we were in was imaginary, and then I asked him to be in Knickers (the band after the Loves but before this one), and we’ve been together ever since. Ahhh.

Ryan plays the bass, and he’s the Old Romantic I’ve known the longest having first crossed paths in Cardiff way back in 2005. In rehearsals when everyone else has a comfort break, Ryan and I will play guitar and drums, respectively, and become a low-rent White Stripes playing Big Star cover versions.

From The Desk Of Simon Love: A Young Boy’s Musical Awakening

Welsh singer/songwriter Simon Love just released his sophomore solo album, Sincerely, S. Love x (Tapete). You should buy it immediately. The foul-mouthed Love will also be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Just in case you aren’t yet aware of this former frontman for the Loves, he took the liberty of introducing himself to you, dear MAGNET reader. And remember, kids: Love is all around and all you need.

Love: The first song I can remember was “Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Old Oak Tree.” It came out three years before I was born, so I was very advanced. I can also remember dancing to “Makin’ Your Mind Up” by Bucks Fizz in my grandma’s front room for the family. I can’t remember if I tried to rip my mum’s skirt off, though.

When I was seven, I got my first hi-fi system. Being seven, I only had two seven-inch singles: “Ghostbusters” by Ray Parker Jr and “Spies Like Us” by Paul McCartney. Obviously, I had a thing for Dan Ackroyd film tie-in songs. My father gave me a rack of seven-inches that he’d had as a youngster for me to fill out my collection. There were three Beatles singles in there. Being an anal child, I listened to them in date order. First was “She Loves You” from 1963. I had a vague knowledge of hearing the “yeah, yeah, yeah”s before. Then it was 1964’s “Can’t Buy Me Love,” another pop classic that kicks straight into the chorus. Next up was “Strawberry Fields Forever.”

I remember being scared of what I was hearing. I remember stopping the record and looking at the label to make sure it was the same band. It couldn’t be. None of the instruments sounded the same as the other two. The singers voice wasn’t upbeat and full of joy like the other two. Instead he sounded like he was in the process of falling over. Over and over.

I started the record again.

I was transfixed for about three and a half minutes, and then it faded out. Phew, I thought. Then it faded back in sounding weirder than ever. It sounded like everything was going wrong and breaking down. Then it ended again.

Then I put the needle to the start and listened to it about five more times in a row.

When I listen to it now, I’m immediately seven again and on my bedroom floor staring in disbelief at this thing of wonder spinning around and around.