From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: Joy Division’s “Unknown Pleasures”

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: Black album cover, black record label, no band pictures or even individual names listed. Urgent and unsettling, still. The singer was not protesting the government or the Queen in a cockney rant. He seemed to be protesting existence itself. A major influence whenever I attempted to write a song myself.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Subway Sect And Suzie And The Banshees, 100 Club, London (September 1976)

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: Was on vacation, alone, pondering whether to return to the university and complete my metaphysical studies. Made me realize you no longer had to be a Ritchie Blackmore or a Carl Palmer to be in a band. I instantly wanted Suzie (that’s the way they spelt it) to be my wife. Upon returning to the USA, I didn’t re-enter the university. Sex Pistols setlist.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: An Eight-Piece Bucket Of Kentucky Fried Chicken And A Case Of Ice-Cold Budweiser Beer

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: Still my death-row final dinner of choice. I think I would gladly follow the padre down the Last Mile after consuming the above.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: David Bowie At Carnegie Hall (September 1972)

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: Bought a couple of tickets out of curiosity after reading several articles about him in the Melody Maker music paper. Had never heard a note of his music. Nobody wanted to go with me, except, surprisingly, a former normal cheerleader from my high school. During the performance, I thought she might be troubled or disturbed, but afterward, she declared that she felt she had just seen “the new Elvis.” She went out and bought Ziggy Stardust, Hunky Dory and The Man Who Sold The World the next day.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: “A Clockwork Orange” (1972)

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: Almost had to leave the theater because of a panic attack. It wasn’t the violence in the movie, but it was the Anglo-Russian slang of the “droogies” that made me think I was losing my mind. Obviously, I had never ready Anthony Burgess’ book.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: Sly And The Family Stone At Woodstock (1969)

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: You had to be there—and I was. Half the bands I wanted to see didn’t show up. (Jeff Beck Group, Procol Harum and the Moody Blues.) The only bands that I wanted to see were the Incredible String Band and the Who. I saw lots of bands—Santana who were billed—I think—as the Santana Blues Band They were great. Creedence was like the Ramones of their time, hitting you over the head with hit after hit. But the unexpected surprise was Sly And The Family Stone. I had no idea how powerful a live act they were. They definitely won the battle of the bands. The movie fails to capture an iota of the power of this performance.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: Herman’s Hermits, The Who And The Blues Magoos, Paramount Theatre, Asbury Park, N.J. (August 1967)

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: My first rock ‘n’ roll show. Full of screaming 12-year-old girls who were prevented from getting too close to the stage by their mothers during the Who’s performance. And don’t laugh—Herman’s Hermits were pretty darn good themselves.

The Who live in Jersey 50 years later, playing a song from the ’67 Asbury Park show:

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: The Rolling Stones On “The Hollywood Palace” (June 1964)

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: They only played one number at the end of the show and looked like grave-robbers from a British Hammer horror movie, especially Bill Wyman. My elders warned me that exposure to this sort of music would ruin my life. In some respects, they were correct.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” And “Telstar”

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: These two other-worldy hit records—“The Lion Sleeps Tonight” and “Telstar”—made me start listening to transistor-radio pop-music stations. I was lured into a world of early Beach Boys, “Micky’s Monkey,” “He’s A Rebel,” et al, and left music of social reality behind.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: Bruce Gordon As Frank Nitti

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: From The Untouchables TV Show. Although a beer-brewing bad guy, I found Bruce Gordon‘s reoccurring character to be much cooler and funnier than Robert Stack’s stiff, humorless Eliot Ness.