From The Desk Of Peter Holsapple: “20th Century Boy” By Duncan Hannah

It makes sense that since Peter Holsapple has long been the go-to guy for musicians such as R.E.M., Hootie & The Blowfish, John Hiatt, Indigo Girls, the Troggs, Juliana Hatfield and too many others to name here that when he needed assistance on his first solo album in 21 years that he would turn to, well, himself. Game Day (Omnivore) is a solo record in the truest sense of the word, as the dB’s co-founder pretty much did everything himself on the LP. Holsapple will being guest editing magnetmagazine.com—for the second time—all week. Grab some beer and some pizza: It’s game day.

Holsapple: Wow! 20th Century Boy, artist/author Duncan Hannah’s journals of his young Manhattan, has been a total treat to read. So many stories, so many characters, it almost seems impossible it could’ve all happened to one person. It was the New York I’d begun reading about back in North Carolina: It sounded irrepressible, artistic and musical, and mostly fun. And Duncan was there and a constant part of it. He had the savvy to write it all down—the subtitle is Notebooks Of The Seventies, and the author has decided to keep his observations intact from their entries. It’s charming, rakish and always written in a somewhat offhand voice.

It’s funny to read this at the same time as I was reading Chris’ autobiography. They’re of an overlapping time in Manhattan, and the circles both Chris and Duncan ran in would conceivably have intersected in a club somewhere downtown. I’m grateful to have both books, to really remember the sense of what drew me to live in New York for my formative adulthood. It was where I wanted to grow up, which I got to do, and I feel that throughout these pages.

From The Desk Of Peter Holsapple: Duke Law School Wrongful Convictions Clinic

It makes sense that since Peter Holsapple has long been the go-to guy for musicians such as R.E.M., Hootie & The Blowfish, John Hiatt, Indigo Girls, the Troggs, Juliana Hatfield and too many others to name here that when he needed assistance on his first solo album in 21 years that he would turn to, well, himself. Game Day (Omnivore) is a solo record in the truest sense of the word, as the dB’s co-founder pretty much did everything himself on the LP. Holsapple will being guest editing magnetmagazine.com—for the second time—all week. Grab some beer and some pizza: It’s game day.

Holsapple: The exemplary work of the Duke Law School Wrongful Convictions Clinic was celebrated this January when the North Carolina NAACP presented them with the 2018 Charles A. McLean Award at their 34th Annual Humanitarian Of The Year Awards Banquet. It was for their efforts to exonerate prisoners who were victims of wrongful convictions. Among those freed was Howard Dudley, who had served 24 years on a charge of child sexual abuse—convicted on the testimony of his daughter, who later recanted, Dudley’s conviction was overturned March 2016.

They have also worked on behalf of Dontae Sharpe, whose case was the subject of an episode of Oxygen Network’s Final Appeal in its first season. I was proud to accompany clinic assistant Sarah Webb Holsapple to the Banquet, where we met and sat with Mr. Dudley and the other members of the clinic’s team: founders/professors James Coleman Jr. and Theresa Newman and clinic attorney Jamie Lau. We also met Rev. Dr. William Barber II, North Carolina’s prominent voice for civil rights and leader of the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call For A Moral Revival. It was a night of great inspiration and the tremendous feeling of power when people are gathered together in the name of seeking justice, and I was proud to accompany the Wrongful Convictions Clinic’s members that amazing night as they were being honored.

From The Desk Of Peter Holsapple: Chunklet Industries

It makes sense that since Peter Holsapple has long been the go-to guy for musicians such as R.E.M., Hootie & The Blowfish, John Hiatt, Indigo Girls, the Troggs, Juliana Hatfield and too many others to name here that when he needed assistance on his first solo album in 21 years that he would turn to, well, himself. Game Day (Omnivore) is a solo record in the truest sense of the word, as the dB’s co-founder pretty much did everything himself on the LP. Holsapple will being guest editing magnetmagazine.com—for the second time—all week. Grab some beer and some pizza: It’s game day.

Holsapple: Over the past few years, I’ve made the acquaintance of one Henry Owings, graphic designer and general entertainment maven/wildman who’s the proprietor of Chunklet Industries. Henry’s the kind of guy you can have a conversation with and realize that you’ve been talking with him for four hours straight. He is incredibly well-informed and a creative whirlwind.

You’ve seen his sleeves for records by Charlie Patton, Captain Beefheart And The Magic Band, Patton Oswald and Lewis Black; his newest and best-known items are, however, T-shirts that feature the alluring sentiment “We’re All In This Together. Except You. You’re A Dick.” and an attractive button with Robert Mueller’s face looking inquiringly at you. Henry has big brains, and he’s got a wonderful sense of humor (he’s also a recording artist with a fascinating single, “Micro Impressions Volume 1”).

If you don’t know his fine works, do look them over at his website and order a few gross of Mueller buttons for your close friends.

From The Desk Of Peter Holsapple: Chickie Wah Wah

It makes sense that since Peter Holsapple has long been the go-to guy for musicians such as R.E.M., Hootie & The Blowfish, John Hiatt, Indigo Girls, the Troggs, Juliana Hatfield and too many others to name here that when he needed assistance on his first solo album in 21 years that he would turn to, well, himself. Game Day (Omnivore) is a solo record in the truest sense of the word, as the dB’s co-founder pretty much did everything himself on the LP. Holsapple will being guest editing magnetmagazine.com—for the second time—all week. Grab some beer and some pizza: It’s game day.

Holsapple: I wish Chickie Wah Wah had been around when I lived in New Orleans. It’s a superb experience playing there in a city full of superb musical experiences. What makes it special? I think that the key difference here is that the audience is first and foremost there to hear and listen to the musicians, rather than pour themselves a raucous good time. There are plenty of places you can do that in New Orleans or New Hampshire or just about anywhere. But find a good listening room, especially one with a well-matched sound system, and both player and listener are satisfied with what they hear.

I’ve played there solo and with the Continental Drifters, and I will say that the stage is not quite as comfortable for a six-piece band (I was basically beneath Russ’ cymbal); but everyone heard everyone else onstage, and in the audience, they liked what they heard—and that’s really the desired result.

I mean absolutely no disrespect to any of the other venues in the Crescent City, ones I’ve played at and others. I just think that Chickie Wah Wah is a rare and beautiful thing in a music city like New Orleans, and that natives and visitors alike can “pass” a good musical time there just digging who’s onstage and not feeling the competitive and exponential drinking/loudness urge. (I’m pretty sure they invite you out if you misbehave like that; their commitment to the musicians’ time there is remarkable.)

Next time, I’m bringing the trio!

From The Desk Of Peter Holsapple: Cheerwine

It makes sense that since Peter Holsapple has long been the go-to guy for musicians such as R.E.M., Hootie & The Blowfish, John Hiatt, Indigo Girls, the Troggs, Juliana Hatfield and too many others to name here that when he needed assistance on his first solo album in 21 years that he would turn to, well, himself. Game Day (Omnivore) is a solo record in the truest sense of the word, as the dB’s co-founder pretty much did everything himself on the LP. Holsapple will being guest editing magnetmagazine.com—for the second time—all week. Grab some beer and some pizza: It’s game day.

Holsapple: From Salisbury, N.C. (also home of Food Lion), Cheerwine is a special kind of good. It’s a soda that’s ostensibly what Dr. Pepper wishes it could be, just a little “fruitier” but not too sweet. It’s particularly good with barbeque sandwiches and hush puppies, though you may want to drain the bottle before the banana pudding. Cheerwine is the oldest continuing soft-drink company still run by the same family, since 1917 as they say. Their red-and-white advertising is classic. You know you want one right now.i

Three other important notes:
1) There was Budwine (previously Bludwine, ulp!) in Georgia that was similar but too sweet. They’re out of business now.
2) Cookout, our local burger chain, features Cheerwine floats.
3) Finally: The previously mentioned Food Lion sells Cheerwine popsicles. I owe it to my friend and Hootie bandmate Gary Greene for hipping me to those. North Carolina summer afternoons are better slurping on one of those.

From The Desk Of Peter Holsapple: B&M Brown Bread

It makes sense that since Peter Holsapple has long been the go-to guy for musicians such as R.E.M., Hootie & The Blowfish, John Hiatt, Indigo Girls, the Troggs, Juliana Hatfield and too many others to name here that when he needed assistance on his first solo album in 21 years that he would turn to, well, himself. Game Day (Omnivore) is a solo record in the truest sense of the word, as the dB’s co-founder pretty much did everything himself on the LP. Holsapple will being guest editing magnetmagazine.com—for the second time—all week. Grab some beer and some pizza: It’s game day.

Holsapple: Among my fondest food memories from growing up was when my mom would serve B&M Brown Bread with their adjacent baked beans. The beans I didn’t really care for—molasses-y and thick, too sweet for a vegetable, too utilitarian for a dessert. But the brown bread was wonderful stuff—butter on top made for a delicious taste that got eaten long before the baked beans ever were!

My children, aged 14 and 10, had a very hard time imagining that you could have bread in a can, and honestly, I was at something of a loss trying to explain it to them. But once it was opened, sliced and served, they understood why I loved it so much. Dense and rich, it’s still one of my most favorite things to eat. (I had the hardest time finding it on my Kroger’s shelves, though. One might’ve thought it’d be seated near its bean accompaniment, but I found it near the baking needs. Go figure.)

From The Desk Of Peter Holsapple: “A Spy In The House Of Loud” By Chris Stamey

It makes sense that since Peter Holsapple has long been the go-to guy for musicians such as R.E.M., Hootie & The Blowfish, John Hiatt, Indigo Girls, the Troggs, Juliana Hatfield and too many others to name here that when he needed assistance on his first solo album in 21 years that he would turn to, well, himself. Game Day (Omnivore) is a solo record in the truest sense of the word, as the dB’s co-founder pretty much did everything himself on the LP. Holsapple will being guest editing magnetmagazine.com—for the second time—all week. Grab some beer and some pizza: It’s game day.

Holsapple: By now, many of you have already bought this book by my longtime friend and guitar partner in the dB’s, Chris Stamey. You can stop reading here, then, if you want.

But if you haven’t, you really want to read A Spy In The House Of Loud, not just because it’s a great story of a remarkable era of New York and music. It’s also a really well-written book, thoughtful and honest and smart, a lot like its author. There’s a great warmth to Chris’ storytelling that makes this book particularly endearing. And it’s not like “you feel like you’re there” but more like you’re sitting around with Chris and he’s telling you the stories almost in confidence. It’s a comfortable voice and the tales aren’t particularly tall—they’re just human and entertaining and informative.

There are no chandeliers being swung from, no television sets through hotel windows or any of that rock-star stuff—you can get plenty of that from Hammer Of The Gods, and really, most of us did that already. But there are wonderful recollections of a different side of the music business from star bands to behold in A Spy In The House Of Loud.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: Katz’s Delicatessen, New York City

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: This is where I would like to shuffle off this mortal coil, after devouring an extra-fat pastrami sandwich on rye, slathered with chopped liver and spicy brown deli mustard. If I have time, add a large slice of Bermuda onion and 10 frosty long necks of Bud. Then may my screen go black like the final Sopranos episode.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: “Pulp Fiction”

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: Thought the projectionist had put in the reels wrong. Had to see Pulp Fiction two more times in a week before my small mind could grasp the flip flop of chronology of events. Also contains the most quotable dialogue since Casablanca or The Godfather.

From The Desk Of The Feelies’ Dave Weckerman: Joy Division’s “Unknown Pleasures”

Percussionist Dave Weckerman has been part of the Feelies story since 1976 when he, Glenn Mercer and Bill Million formed the Outkids, which quickly evolved into the Feelies. Following the release of seminal 1980 debut Crazy Rhythms, the group went on a sort of short-lived hiatus, though the band members played together in a number of offshoots, including the Trypes, the Willies and Yung Wu. 1987’s Shore Leave was the sole album by Yung Wu, which featured Weckerman as singer/songwriter backed by Mercer, Million and fellow Feelies Brenda Sauter and Stan Demeski. The long-out-of-print Shore Leave has just been reissued by Bar/None, so we asked Weckerman to guest edit magnetmagazine.com. He said yes and will be writing about “some favorite things and cultural touchstones in my life (so far)” all week.

Weckerman: Black album cover, black record label, no band pictures or even individual names listed. Urgent and unsettling, still. The singer was not protesting the government or the Queen in a cockney rant. He seemed to be protesting existence itself. A major influence whenever I attempted to write a song myself.