Grandaddy Clause: Jeff Lynne

jasonlogoeAfter the dissolution of beloved sci-fi pop outfit Grandaddy in 2006, frontman Jason Lytle left behind California’s blue suburban skies for the peace, quiet and sobriety of Montana. This week, Lytle re-emerges with news of a solo debut and a part-time seasonal job as guest editor for magnetmagazine.com. Read our new Q&A with Lytle about his forthcoming album, Yours Truly, The Commuter (Anti-), here.

Lytle: Everything Jeff Lynne has done—from the Idle Race, the Move, ELO, the Traveling Wilburys and even his current solo stuff—I love it. I love everything. One of my living and breathing heroes. He is one of the people I would love to meet. He seems like a totally charming man, a real stand-up guy.

ELO’s “Don’t Bring Me Down” from 1979’s Discovery:

For an in-depth piece on Lytle circa the end of Grandaddy, read our 2006 cover story here.

Grandaddy Clause: Breathe Right Nasal Strips

jasonlogoeAfter the dissolution of beloved sci-fi pop outfit Grandaddy in 2006, frontman Jason Lytle left behind California’s blue suburban skies for the peace, quiet and sobriety of Montana. This week, Lytle re-emerges with news of a solo debut and a part-time seasonal job as guest editor for magnetmagazine.com.

Read our new Q&A with Lytle about his forthcoming album, Yours Truly, The Commuter (Anti-), here.

breath_h250Lytle: I used to have allergy problems, and I’ve suffered slightly from insomnia. Right now, I have this full-on arsenal: a cup of NyQuil, Breathe Right nasal strips, ear plugs and I’m sleeping on a Tempur-Pedic bed. I’m attempting this sensory-deprivation state of sleep with the Breathe Rights as my ace in the hole. I’ve thought about getting nasal surgery, but I can get 30 years’ worth of Breathe Rights for the money it would take to have the operation. And there’s no guarantee with surgery. You could end up with a mono-nostril.

For an in-depth piece on Lytle circa the end of Grandaddy, read our 2006 cover story here.

Grandaddy Clause: Clint Eastwood

jasonlogoeAfter the dissolution of beloved sci-fi pop outfit Grandaddy in 2006, frontman Jason Lytle left behind California’s blue suburban skies for the peace, quiet and sobriety of Montana. This week, Lytle re-emerges with news of a solo debut and a part-time seasonal job as guest editor for magnetmagazine.com.

Read our new Q&A with Lytle about his forthcoming album, Yours Truly, The Commuter (Anti-), here.

clint550cLytle: Clint Eastwood is pretty much my hero all the way around for every reason: that it’s good to be an artist and good to be alive. I like pretty much everything he’s done, and I’m even gonna cut him some slack with Every Which Way But Loose and Any Which Way You Can, his orangutan movies.

Scene from 1978’s Every Which Way But Loose, in which Eastwood’s mom complains about Clyde the orangutan eating all her Oreos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMNvYhI4AzM

For an in-depth piece on Lytle circa the end of Grandaddy, read our 2006 cover story here.

Grandaddy Clause: Heinz Ketchup

jasonlogoeAfter the dissolution of beloved sci-fi pop outfit Grandaddy in 2006, frontman Jason Lytle left behind California’s blue suburban skies for the peace, quiet and sobriety of Montana. This week, Lytle re-emerges with news of a solo debut and a part-time seasonal job as guest editor for magnetmagazine.com.

Read our new Q&A with Lytle about his forthcoming album, Yours Truly, The Commuter (Anti-), here.

ketchupcLytle: I like eating good food, but I have a problem with restaurants that don’t serve ketchup because they think there’s something lowly about it. My taste in food is very simple, so a little ketchup goes a long way. I can get a bowl of rice, some crunched-up tortilla chips and some black beans, drown the whole thing in ketchup, and that would be a dream meal to me. And ketchup on steak is incredible! Another favorite that gets some sideways glances is I accidentally discovered that pancakes in syrup with a little ketchup squirted on it is really good. My favorite brand is Heinz because it’s on the cover of The Who Sell Out.

For an in-depth piece on Lytle circa the end of Grandaddy, read our 2006 cover story here.

Grandaddy Clause: Beck

jasonlogoeAfter the dissolution of beloved sci-fi pop outfit Grandaddy in 2006, frontman Jason Lytle left behind California’s blue suburban skies for the peace, quiet and sobriety of Montana. This week, Lytle re-emerges with news of a solo debut and a part-time seasonal job as guest editor for magnetmagazine.com. Read our new Q&A with Lytle about his forthcoming album, Yours Truly, The Commuter (Anti-), here.

beckdonkey

Lytle: Beck can do no wrong in my book. He’s pretty much pulling off what Prince thought he was gonna pull off at one point, as far as jumping all over the place and remaining a true artist. Somehow, his body of work is super-cohesive regardless of the fact that his albums do tend to sound a lot different from each other.

Beck’s “We Live Again” from 1998’s Mutations:

For an in-depth piece on Lytle circa the end of Grandaddy, read our 2006 cover story here.

Q&A With Jason Lytle

jason_hill555Even when he was in his late 20s, Jason Lytle—about to turn 40 in March—seemed old for his time. The burden of being the only songwriter/main creative force for indie-rock cult faves Grandaddy seemed to weigh heavily on him. Since dissolving the band and moving to Bozeman, Mont., a few years ago, Lytle seems much happier, at least on the phone. He loves mountain-biking, still skateboards and goes on long hiking treks into the wilderness, things he couldn’t do so easily when he lived in Modesto, Calif. Montana’s climate certainly fits Lytle’s clothes. Now that he’s signed a record deal with respected Los Angeles label Anti- for his debut solo album, Yours Truly, The Commuter (due out May 19), he can continue to do what he does best: write some of the most appealing songs of the last 15 years and, hopefully, avoid the pitfalls of his earlier musical experiences.

MAGNET spoke to ex-Grandaddy frontman from his Bozeman residence. Lytle will be the guest editor of magnetmagazine.com all this week. Check back for his daily posts on favorite music, film, literature and more.

Grandaddy’s “Nature Anthem” from 2004’s Artist’s Choice: Below The Radio:

Continue reading “Q&A With Jason Lytle”

From The Desk Of A.C. Newman: Leonard Michaels

carlnewmanpresscrop41“There are maybe 10 or 12 things I could teach you,” sings Carl “A.C.” Newman on his new solo album, Get Guilty (Matador). “After that, well, you’re on your own.” This week, MAGNET lets the New Pornographers frontman steer our website toward 10 or 12 of his own favorite things in music, film, literature and life.

Read our verdict on the orchestral-pop case of Get Guilty and a Q&A deposition with Newman here.

leonardmichaels350Newman: Leonard Michaels is a short story writer who started writing in the 50s. He didn’t put out that much. (Publishers) Farrar, Straus and Giroux just put out The Collected Stories, which is a massive chunk of everything he did. He’s kind of an angry Jewish writer. He’s darker and more experimental than Philip Roth. Portnoy’s Complaint (Roth’s 1969 novel) is warped but still kind of cute; Leonard Michaels was a lot darker. He kind of reminds me of Grace Paley, too. Leonard Michaels’ son, Jesse, actually was the singer in Operation Ivy. I learned that from Wikipedia, by the way.

Read an excerpt of Michaels’ short story “Murderers” here.

This concludes “A.C. Newman Week” here at magnetmagazine.com. Thanks to Carl for ruthlessly dictating our content. Go to the store and buy Get Guilty along with four copies of the latest issue of MAGNET. To read our 2005 cover story on Newman and the New Pornographers, click here.

From The Desk Of A.C. Newman: Farm Sanctuary

carlnewmanpresscrop41“There are maybe 10 or 12 things I could teach you,” sings Carl “A.C.” Newman on his new solo album, Get Guilty (Matador). “After that, well, you’re on your own.” This week, MAGNET lets the New Pornographers frontman steer our website toward 10 or 12 of his own favorite things in music, film, literature and life.

Read our verdict on the orchestral-pop case of Get Guilty and a Q&A deposition with Newman here.

lily-pig_228x221cowsb1721sheepc

Newman: Farm Sanctuary is a rescue and rehabilitation center for farm animals; it’s a cause my wife and I support. I’m not a freaky vegetarian who wants to make sure animals are never killed or eaten, but I think it’s important that they’re treated humanely. Factory farms are pretty disgusting. Everybody loves animals, don’t they? I think it’s important for people to remember where their food comes from. Food isn’t just a magical thing that shows up. It’s weird to talk about; I don’t want to seem like a hippie. Nevertheless, it’s important.

From The Desk Of A.C. Newman: “Rock Of Love”

carlnewmanpresscrop41“There are maybe 10 or 12 things I could teach you,” sings Carl “A.C.” Newman on his new solo album, Get Guilty (Matador). “After that, well, you’re on your own.” This week, MAGNET lets the New Pornographers frontman steer our website toward 10 or 12 of his own favorite things in music, film, literature and life.

Read our verdict on the orchestral-pop case of Get Guilty and a Q&A deposition with Newman here.

rockoflovecharm55

Newman: I’m not even sure I enjoy watching some of these VH-1 shows. I really think it’s an addiction. It’s like heroin crossed with a car accident. With Rock Of Love and Rock Of Love Charm School, you hate everybody on the show yet you watch it somehow. I hate being manipulated by them. I wish I could stop. It’s just too easy to relapse.

 

From The Desk Of A.C. Newman: The Seekers

carlnewmanpresscrop41“There are maybe 10 or 12 things I could teach you,” sings Carl “A.C.” Newman on his new solo album, Get Guilty (Matador). “After that, well, you’re on your own.” This week, MAGNET lets the New Pornographers frontman steer our website toward 10 or 12 of his own favorite things in music, film, literature and life.

Read our verdict on the orchestral-pop case of Get Guilty and a Q&A deposition with Newman here.

seekers-1Newman: I was really into the Seekers years ago. I re-bought all their stuff on iTunes because I didn’t know where my vinyl was. There’s something amazingly hopeful and joyous in their music. It’s joyous in the way that church music should be. There’s something kind of cheesy about it—you could look at it and compare it to A Mighty Wind: that white-bread folk music. Like Dylan is authentic and the Seekers are these weird Peter Paul And Mary-style also-rans. I always loved them. “Georgy Girl” was a great song. They’re a real guilty pleasure of mine.

The Seekers’ “I’ll Never Find Another You”:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfLstywUh90