Live Review: KMFDM, Philadelphia, PA, Sept. 24, 2009

KMFDM

Twenty-five years, almost as many albums and an ever-changing band of misfits follow Sascha Konietzko, frontman and the only original member of KMFDM, around this year on the band’s world tour. The Philly crowd at the TLA was a mixture of ’80s metal heads who have been around since the beginning, Hot Topic goth kids and mosh-pit junkies. Not many were standing yet as opening group AngelSpit started its set, but the crowd quickly filled just before KMFDM hit the stage. Lucia Cifarelli and Konietzko (half the time with a cigarette in his mouth) were front and center pushing buttons and turning knobs, generating KMFDM’s signature “ultra heavy beats,” joined by guitarists Jules Hodgson and Steve White and drummer Andy Selway. No time was wasted on talking, and they started right into the music, which was a good combination of old and new songs plucked from their vast play list. Though they left out some favorites like “Juke Joint Jezebel,” they did play “WWIII” and “Never Say Never.” Konietzko still has it in him to put on an amazing performance, and with Cifarelli at his side, the show all comes together. Twenty-five years and still running strong with no signs of slowing down is what makes KMFDM one of the greatest heavy-hitting bands of all time.

—text and photo by Miranda Watson

Film At 11: New Model Army

Almost three decades have gone by and New Model Army continues to keep the ball rolling with new album Today Is A Good Day (Attack Attack), which came out last week. Check out the British band’s promo video, which is a sampler of songs from Today Is A Good Day. New Model Army is on tour in North America until October 13.

TiVo Party Tonight: Noisettes, Ladyhawke

TIVOLadyhawkeEver wonder what will happen during the last five minutes of late-night TV talk shows? Here are tonight’s notable performers:

The Late Show With David Letterman (CBS): Noisettes
These British pop/punk/folk rockers have demonstrated their versatility with their recent Wild Young Hearts. The band will be spreading the word on its new album tonight, then heading off to begin its European tour.

Last Call With Carson Daly (NBC): Ladyhawke
New Zealand’s Ladyhawke (a.k.a. Phillipa “Pip” Brown) will be performing on Last Call tonight and promoting her current U.S. tour with Ida Maria.

Richard Hawley’s Notes From Sheffield: The Hawaiian Guitar And Lap Steel

HawleylogoA deep-voiced, working-class songwriter with an affinity for ’50s-era crooners, American country music and grand orchestration, Richard Hawley has paid tribute to his hometown of Sheffield, England, through songwriting that serves as a sepia-toned photograph of timeless places and love-troubled lives. While it may seem as if nothing changes in Hawley’s stylishly retro work, sixth album Truelove’s Gutter (Mute) is a deceptively tranquil sea change of sonics—employing glass harmonica, waterphone and other ethereal sounds—and themes, with the album delving into lyrical topics of dashed hopes, drug addiction and, of course, love gone wrong. Befitting its title, Truelove’s Gutter finds Hawley trawling Sheffield’s shadows and back alleys on his most spacious, soul-baring album to date. Hawley is guest editing magnetmagazine.com this week. Read our Q&A with him.

lap-steel-guitar_melob-Hawley: I used to do the shopping once every two weeks for an old man who lived opposite my uncle’s house. He was called Jack Wilcox. He was a sweet guy, very kind. After about a year, he said, “Your uncle tells me your into playing guitar.” I replied, “Yes.” He said, “Well, I have a few things you may be interested in.” He showed me his lap steel, an old Selmer from 1937, and an old Epiphone Zenith jazz guitar from ’38. It blew my mind. I was already listening to Santo & Johnny, Bob Wills, Speedy West, Lloyd Green and the slide guitar of Muddy Waters and Elmore James, but to find a guy who not only knew about this stuff but who actually had a lap steel at the end of my street was a bit of a head fuck. But it was serendipity. Or so I am told by bigger brains than mine. The sound of it, in the right hands, is the nearest thing to the sound of angels I think I am likely to hear. I still have the Selmer and used it on most of my records. I think of Jack often. He was good man. He played in long-forgotten dance bands in England in the ’40s and ’50s. His knowledge was vast, and he always wore it lightly and shared it freely.

MP3 At 3PM: Ivan & Alyosha

ivanalyosha3823With “Easy To Love” from their debut EP, The Verse, The Chorus (due October 10 on Cheap Lullaby), Ivan & Alyosha announce themselves as musicians rooted in the reality of romanticism. The duo named after Dostoyevsky characters—vocalist Tim Wilson and multi-instrumentalist Ryan Carbary—creates honest and artful songs that pair  strumming and drumming with an occasional sweet whistle to make your heart leap.

“Easy To Love” (download):
http://magnetmagazine.com/audio/EasyToLove.mp3

Richard Hawley’s Notes From Sheffield: John D. Loudermilk

HawleylogoA deep-voiced, working-class songwriter with an affinity for ’50s-era crooners, American country music and grand orchestration, Richard Hawley has paid tribute to his hometown of Sheffield, England, through songwriting that serves as a sepia-toned photograph of timeless places and love-troubled lives. While it may seem as if nothing changes in Hawley’s stylishly retro work, sixth album Truelove’s Gutter (Mute) is a deceptively tranquil sea change of sonics—employing glass harmonica, waterphone and other ethereal sounds—and themes, with the album delving into lyrical topics of dashed hopes, drug addiction and, of course, love gone wrong. Befitting its title, Truelove’s Gutter finds Hawley trawling Sheffield’s shadows and back alleys on his most spacious, soul-baring album to date. Hawley is guest editing magnetmagazine.com this week. Read our Q&A with him.

JohnDLoudermilkHawley: John D. Loudermilk is one of my favorite songwriters of all time. He’s a great American songwriter who has written through most of the second half of the 20th century. He wrote “Tobacco Road.” Need I say more? Video after the jump.

Continue reading “Richard Hawley’s Notes From Sheffield: John D. Loudermilk”

Film At 11: The Walkmen

The Walkmen stay true to their sound on latest album You And Me (Gigantic). The video for “On The Water,” directed by Nir Ben Jacob, is very surreal with its use of CGI. It fits well with the gloomy tone of the Walkmen, who in the end bring you down but leave you with a smile.

http://www.vimeo.com/6156126

TiVo Party Tonight: Snow Patrol, Phoenix

TIVOPheonix461Ever wonder what will happen during the last five minutes of late-night TV talk shows? Here are tonight’s notable performers:

The Late Show With David Letterman (CBS): Snow Patrol
Snow Patrol will be performing songs from last year’s A Hundred Million Suns on Letterman. The band has just released a video for its new single, “Just Say Yes,” from Up To Now, which is due out in November. Don’t get too excited for fresh tracks, though. The LP is a two-disc, 30-song collection of fan favorites, which explains why SP will be sticking to oldies for tonight’s performance.

Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (NBC): Phoenix
Phoenix will perform on Fallon tonight. The Frenchmen will soon be winding down their U.S. tour and shipping off to play around Europe until December, at which point Canada will get its turn. Last but not least?

Richard Hawley’s Notes From Sheffield: Sheffield Wednesday

HawleylogoA deep-voiced, working-class songwriter with an affinity for ’50s-era crooners, American country music and grand orchestration, Richard Hawley has paid tribute to his hometown of Sheffield, England, through songwriting that serves as a sepia-toned photograph of timeless places and love-troubled lives. While it may seem as if nothing changes in Hawley’s stylishly retro work, sixth album Truelove’s Gutter (Mute) is a deceptively tranquil sea change of sonics—employing glass harmonica, waterphone and other ethereal sounds—and themes, with the album delving into lyrical topics of dashed hopes, drug addiction and, of course, love gone wrong. Befitting its title, Truelove’s Gutter finds Hawley trawling Sheffield’s shadows and back alleys on his most spacious, soul-baring album to date. Hawley is guest editing magnetmagazine.com this week. Read our Q&A with him.

SHEFIELDSUNDAY

Hawley: Oh dear. Supporting Sheffield Wednesday is a life issue; my earliest memory is standing on the kop, holding my grandfather’s hand. (All football grounds in Britain have a kop; it came first from Liverpool’s football club after a regiment of Liverpool soldiers were wiped out in the Boer War at a battleground called Spion Kop. True. Honest.) Anyway, in general, Wednesday aren’t very good, but I love them. It’s a loyalty thing. I haven’t been to a game for two years because of touring, but I always check the results. Usually, it’s not good, but when they win, I float above the ground. Well, for a while, at least. I don’t just sing when we’re winning.