From The Desk Of The Veils: Hats

VeilsLogoTime Stays, We Go (Pitch Beast)—the Veils‘ 10-track, fourth release—is both patiently restrained and wildly emotional. It’s full of lush brass and sing-along melodies, moments of surf-rock guitar and beachside ukulele, and essential personal queries within the struggles of the human endeavor. It’s a small dose of Pixies, and definitely reminiscent of Talking Heads, with a nod toward Jeff Buckley. In other words, Time Stays has a familiar quality despite its newness, and it’s instantly likeable, much like frontman Finn Andrews himself. Andrews and bassist Sophia Burn will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new Veils feature.

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Finn: I’m not sure if you’ve noticed this, but I like to wear hats. It’s become far more of a trademark of mine than I ever intended, but I’m still amazed at the fascination it seems to create in people even to this day. I’ve always hated my hair—before wavey, mousey and uncontrollable, now thinning at the crown and probably not long for this world given my father’s bright, shining dome. I’ve worn them since I was a kid, throughout my adolescence; now I put one on almost every time I take to a stage or do an interview, a kind of shield from the world, or I guess, yeah, a veil …

I remember when I first came to London to start the band being asked will we be signed under a band name or under mine. I couldn’t bear the idea of it being my name up there with nothing standing between me and everything else. The name the Veils was chosen as a deliberate reference to this. I thought of it as a sort of tarpaulin I could put up above my work bench so that no one could quite tell what was going on beneath it, and I think the hat is sort of an extension of this. I genuinely worry that if I take it off, my brain might just blow away.

Video after the jump.

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Film At 11: The Dandy Warhols

The Dandy Warhols are known for their eccentric videos, and the latest one lives up to the standard. This clip for “Rest Your Head,” off This Machine (The End) and directed by Jean-Francois Rivard, shows the members of the Dandys getting their heads blown off in a robot factory. Watch it below.

From The Desk Of The Veils: Van Morrison’s “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue”

VeilsLogoTime Stays, We Go (Pitch Beast)—the Veils‘ 10-track, fourth release—is both patiently restrained and wildly emotional. It’s full of lush brass and sing-along melodies, moments of surf-rock guitar and beachside ukulele, and essential personal queries within the struggles of the human endeavor. It’s a small dose of Pixies, and definitely reminiscent of Talking Heads, with a nod toward Jeff Buckley. In other words, Time Stays has a familiar quality despite its newness, and it’s instantly likeable, much like frontman Finn Andrews himself. Andrews and bassist Sophia Burn will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our brand new Veils feature.

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Soph: This is the song. I can’t give it up, now. I think I first heard it on the soundtrack to Basquiat. Maybe that’s a little embarrassing to admit, that I didn’t hear it when my impeccable eye picked it out of a dusty second-hand record shop. I heard it in a film that I loved, that I’ve later discovered not everyone loved, that may not even be a great film, but I loved it, and I can still do a really good impression of David Bowie doing an impression of Andy Warhol.

But so this is how I heard the song. It wasn’t until much later that someone told me Dylan wrote it and Beck had sampled it. I just really liked it.

It’s a great song. It’s like the ultimate song. It’s got everything. It’s a love song, and it’s a heartbroken love song, but with that resignation/snideness that I love in heartbroken love songs. Like “Miss You” and “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome” and “I Break Horses.”

Then it’s got Van and bass to die for and one of the most beautiful melodies of all time. How did they even do that bass? What is that? It says something about me, maybe, that I don’t actually even know how to play it. But the thing is, the thing that I think as well is true of most great bass, is that I could learn to play this, and torture everyone in soundchecks, but it wouldn’t mean anything without the song. I’d have to teach everyone to play along, for it to make any sense at all.

I don’t think any of this is why I love this song so much. But maybe it is. I don’t know why I love this song so much. I just really love this song.