From The Desk Of Fitz And The Tantrums: Millennium

Fitz&TheTantrumsLogoIn 2010, Fitz And The Tantrums made their debut album with Pickin’ Up The Pieces. Whether the modern R&B album went triple platinum is inconsequential. Storming songs like “MoneyGrabber” put the band on Leno, Kimmel and Conan, and the soulful sound and fashion-forward sight of singer/songwriter Michael Fitzpatrick—with backing vocalist pal Noelle Scaggs and Fitz’s four additional members—made them suddenly ubiquitous. Along with that televised attention came constant touring. Nothing wrong with that. They sound like a tantrum, and their contemporary raw mix of Stax and Motown—with Fitzpatrick’s powerfully emotive vocals before it—was something to see. Now, they’re dropping their second album, More Than Just A Dream (Elektra), and the whole affair sounds as fast and hard as their live shows, with an odd electronic sheen to the proceedings. Fitzpatrick and Scaggs will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our recent Q&A with Fitzpatrick.

Millenium

Noelle: I just had my first truly vegan cuisine experience in San Francisco recently. I never thought of anything vegan as being something that had flavor and didn’t just involve soy. I was proven completely wrong, and Millennium has changed my perspective on how vegan can be a satisfying fine-dining experience.

Video after the jump.

Continue reading “From The Desk Of Fitz And The Tantrums: Millennium”

Vintage Movies: “Fargo”

MAGNET contributing writer Jud Cost is sharing some of the wealth of classic films he’s been lucky enough to see over the past 40 years. Trolling the backwaters of cinema, he has worked up a list of more than 500 titles—from the silent era through the ’90s—that you may have missed. A new selection, all currently available on DVD, appears every week.

Fargo

Fargo (1996, 98 minutes)

It’s the dead of winter at a crossroads near Fargo, N.D. Merle Haggard is playing on the jukebox at The King Of Clubs as a man in a floppy golf hat (William H. Macy) walks inside and immediately spots his contacts seated behind six Bud longnecks.

“I’m Jerry Lundegaard,” he says to the short man with the mustache, as though he were selling life insurance. “Shep Proudfoot said you’d be here at 7:30. We’ve been sitting here for an hour. He’s peed three times,” says the short man (Steve Buscemi), gesturing at his companion (Peter Stormare), a lanky tow-head, nodding off with a cigarette dangling from his mouth. “I’m Carl Showalter and this is my associate, Gaear Grimsrud. You got the car?” “Yeah, it’s out in the lot, a brand-new, burnt-umber Ciera.”

“What Shep told us didn’t make a lot of sense,” says Carl as Grimsrud begins to wake up. “You want your own wife kidnapped?” “It’s all worked-out,” explains Jerry. “It’s not me payin’ the ransom, see. Her dad’s real well-off. I need money.” The kidnappers and Jerry will split the $80,000 ransom right down the middle. Carl remains doubtful: “You’re tasking us to perform this mission, but you won’t tell us … Aw, fuck it, let’s take a look at that car.”

Jerry’s father-in-law, Wade Gustafson (Harve Presnell), informs Jerry next morning that his recent financial proposal might work, after all. Desperate to get in touch with the men he hired to put the alternate plan into operation, Jerry strides into the maintenance bay at the Minneapolis auto dealership where he works. “Howya doin’ there, Shep?” he asks a Native American mechanic tinkering with a car up on a hydraulic lift. “You know those two fellas you put me in touch with? I may not need  them, after all. See, this deal I needed them for? Something’s happened. Thought you might know an alternate phone number.” “Nope,” says Shep.

Jerry’s wife Jean (Kristin Rudrud) is nestled in the family room watching a morning cooking show demonstrating how to make “holidazzle eggs.” A man in a black ski mask suddenly appears at the slider on the rear deck and shatters the glass with a crowbar.

At the same time, his partner walks right into the house through the unlocked front door and grabs the terrified woman. She bites him on the hand and runs to the upstairs bathroom. Obsessively searching for unguent to treat his wound, Grimsrud notices her in the medicine-cabinet’s mirror, trembling behind the shower curtain. He rips down the plastic and grabs her. She escapes but falls down the stairs like a bagful of old suitcases. The thugs load her unconscious body, wrapped in the shower curtain, into the Ciera’s trunk and take off for the South Dakota state line.

From The Desk Of Fitz And The Tantrums: LA Mill

Fitz&TheTantrumsLogoIn 2010, Fitz And The Tantrums made their debut album with Pickin’ Up The Pieces. Whether the modern R&B album went triple platinum is inconsequential. Storming songs like “MoneyGrabber” put the band on Leno, Kimmel and Conan, and the soulful sound and fashion-forward sight of singer/songwriter Michael Fitzpatrick—with backing vocalist pal Noelle Scaggs and Fitz’s four additional members—made them suddenly ubiquitous. Along with that televised attention came constant touring. Nothing wrong with that. They sound like a tantrum, and their contemporary raw mix of Stax and Motown—with Fitzpatrick’s powerfully emotive vocals before it—was something to see. Now, they’re dropping their second album, More Than Just A Dream (Elektra), and the whole affair sounds as fast and hard as their live shows, with an odd electronic sheen to the proceedings. Fitzpatrick and Scaggs will be guest editing magnetmagazine.com all week. Read our recent Q&A with Fitzpatrick.

LAMill

Fitz: I’m a coffee addict, and I need a great latte from specialty roasters like LA Mill or Handsome Coffee to get my fix.

Video after the jump.

Continue reading “From The Desk Of Fitz And The Tantrums: LA Mill”

Film At 11: Carmen Villain

Hailing from London, Carmen Villain put out her Smalltown Supersound debut, Sleeper, on March 12. Villain’s music career is expanding beyond her U.K. homeland, most recently to the west for her first NYC concert at Pianos on April 23. Watch her latest video, for “Easy,” below.